Chapter 28: Revolution & National States in the Atlantic World

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  • Key Concepts for this chapter
    • KC-5.3
      • The 18th century marked the beginning of an intense period of revolution & rebellion against existing governments, leading to the establishment of new nation-states around the world
    • KC-5.3.I.A
      • Enlightenment philosophies applied new ways of understanding & empiricist approaches to both the natural world & human relationships; they also reexamined the role that religion played in public life & emphasized the importance of reason
      • The rise & diffusion of Enlightenment thought that questioned established traditions in all areas of life often preceded revolutions & rebellions against existing governments (American revolution)
    • KC-5.4.I.B
      • The Declaration of Independence: a true example of enlightened philosophy to be used to pursue independence & democratic ideas
    • KC-5.3.I.B
      • The ideas of Enlightenment philosophers, as reflected in revolutionary documents-influenced resistance to existing political authority, often in pursuit of independence & democratic ideas
        • Declaration of the Rights of Man & the Citizens
        • Letter from Jamaica: Simon Bolivar
    • KC-5.3.IV.A.i
      • Discontent with monarchist & imperial rule encouraged the development of systems of government & various ideologies, including democracy & 19th century liberalism
    • KC-5.3.I.C
      • Enlightenment ideas & religious ideals influenced various reform movements
      • These reform movements contributed to the expansion of rights, as seen in expanded suffrage, the abolition of slavery & the end of serfdom
    • KC-5.3.II.ii
      • People around the world development a new sense of commonality based on: Language, religion, social customs, territory
    • KC-5.3.II.i
      • Nationalism became a major force shaping the historical development of states & empires from here on out
    • KC-5.3.II.iii
      • Newly imagined national communities often linked this new national identity with borders of the sates, & in some cases, nationalists challenged boundaries or sought unification of fragment regions

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