Chapter 29: The Making of Industrial Society

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    • Chapter 29


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  • Key Concepts for this chapter
    • KC-5.1.I.D
      • As new methods of industrial production became more common in parts of northwestern Europe, they spread to other parts of Europe & the US, Russia & Japan
    • KC-5.1.I.B
      • The development of machines, including steam engines & the internal combustion engine, made it possible to take advantage of both existing & vast newly discovered resources of energy stored in fossil fuels, specifically coal and oil
      • The fossil fuels revolution greatly increased the energy available to human societies
    • KC-5.1.I.E
      • This led to new methods in the production of (steel, chemicals, electricity, precision machinery)
    • KC-5.1.II.B
      • The rapid development of steam-powered industrial production in European countries & the US contributed to the increase in these regions share of global manufacturing during the 1st industrial revolution
    • KC-5.1.IV
      • These all made exploration, development & communication possible in interior regions globally, which led to increased trade & migration
    • KC-5.1.I.C
      • The development of the factory system concentrated production in a single location & led to an increasing degree of specialization of labor
    • KC-5.1.V.A
      • In industrialized states, many workers organized themselves, often in labor unions
      • Workers movement & political parties emerged in different areas, promoting alternative visions of society.
    • KC-5.1.VI.C
      • The rapid urbanization that accompanied global capitalism at times led to a varied of challenges
    • KC-5.1.VI.A
      • New Social classes, including the middle class & the industrial working class developed
    • KC-5.1.VI.B
      • Both women & children were needed to supplement their families’ income
      • middle class women who didn’t have the same economics demands increasingly limited to roles in the household or roles focused on child development
      • Working class women expected to work until marriage
    • KC-5.1.III.A
      • Western European countries began abandoning mercantilism & adopting free trade policies, partly in response to the growing acceptance of Adam Smith’s theories of laissez-faire capitalism & free market
    • KC-5.1.III.B
      • The global nature of trade & production contributed to the proliferation of large-scale transnational businesses that relied on new practices in banking & finance
    • KC-5.1
      • The development of industrial capitalism led to increased standards of living for some, & to continued improvement in manufacturing methods that increased the availability, affordability, & variety of consumer goods.
    • KC-5.1.V.D
      • In response to the social & economic changes brought about by industrial capitalism, some government, organizations, & individuals promoted various types of political, social, educational, & urban reforms
    • KC-5.3.IV.A.ii
      • Discontent with established power structures encouraged the development of various ideologies, including those espoused by Karl Marx & ideas of socialism & communism

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